70th Annual Peabody Award winners announced

March 31, 2011 – 10:59 AM

A record 39 recipients of the 70th Annual Peabody Awards were announced today by the University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication. The winners, chosen by the Peabody board as the best in electronic media for the year 2010, were named in a ceremony in the Peabody Gallery on the University of Georgia campus.

Winners include:

The Good Wife (CBS)
In this densely layered dramatic series, the dutiful wife of a disgraced politician resumes her legal career and finds satisfaction, self-worth and moral quandaries of her own.

30 for 30 (ESPN)
Commissioned for the sports channel’s 30th anniversary, about sports in America, well, they shoot, they score.

If God Is Willing and da Creek Don’t Rise (HBO)
Spike Lee’s team checks up on New Orleans five years after Katrina hit and the levees broke and documents the city’s successes and failures in a video patchwork by turns beautiful, depressing and optimistic.

The Moth Radio Hour (Public Radio Stations)
Storytelling, likely the oldest art, is revered and reinvigorated by this weekly hour for everyday raconteurs.

Degrassi: My Body Is a Cage (TeenNick)
True to its history, the durable high-school serial’s two-parter about a transgender teen neither trivializes nor overdramatizes its subject.

Men of a Certain Age (TNT)
A series about three longtime pals, “regular” guys, navigating middle age, it’s comical, poignant and harrowing, sometimes all at once.

Sherlock: A Study in Pink (PBS)
The venerable Victorian sleuth is audaciously updated for our high-tech times, and the game is afoot all the quicker.

Radiolab (WNYC-FM)
Immersive and boundlessly imaginative, the series uses pithy prose and state-of-the-art sound to illuminate complicated scientific and philosophical subjects.

Justified (FX)
Part morality play, part character study, this engrossing modern-day Western drama sets its showdowns in the wild, wild east of Appalachian Kentucky.

All entries become a permanent part of the Peabody Archive in the University of Georgia Libraries. The collection is one of the nation’s oldest, largest and most respected moving-image archives. For more information about the Peabody Archive or the Peabody Awards, visit www.peabody.uga.edu.

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